Journal of 50 Artists Round 2 (Part 1)

Hello there! If you’re coming across this post without any idea what it’s going to be, I suggest you check out my last version of this project from a couple of years ago by clicking here. If you do know what you’re looking at and what to expect, welcome! Here I’m going to share 50 photographers whose work I find intriguing or exciting! For each artist, I will put an example of their work, a quick overview of what they’re all about, and a link to their website / portfolio (when possible). Hope you enjoy!


#50

Clémentine Schneidermann

Spring, Gurnos, 2017. Clémentine Schneidermann and Charlotte James

Spring, Gurnos, 2017. Clémentine Schneidermann and Charlotte James

One of the most powerful things about photography is it’s ability to change perception. Photographer Clémentine Schneidermann and stylist Charlotte James know this power. The team set out to photograph children in a small former mining town in South Wales to bring some life and energy back to the dreary community… I think it worked! “It’s Called Ffasiwn” is a beautiful set of images that evoke wonder and delight.

More of Clémentine’s work can be found on their website here.


#49

Margaret Mitchell

The Eastern Wood. Teenage Soldier about to leave on his first tour of Iraq. Margaret Mitchell

The Eastern Wood. Teenage Soldier about to leave on his first tour of Iraq. Margaret Mitchell

Mitchell’s series “The Eastern Wood” hits home for me. In this series she aims to portray what it’s like to come of age in such a contained environment as this rural community in the Netherlands. Growing up in rural Maine I identify with many of the photos and the overall feeling of the series. The isolation and quirkiness portrayed in the work is stunning and makes me feel personally connected to each subject.

Margaret Mitchell’s website can be found here.


#48

Soomin Ham

Song of “Schoolboy”. Archival pigment print on Hanji. Soomin Ham

Song of “Schoolboy”. Archival pigment print on Hanji. Soomin Ham

Many photographers, including myself, owe some sort of inspiration from finding photographs that relatives once took. Soomin Ham is another who used the old to create something new. Ham found a box of her grandfathers old photos that her grandfather made during the 1930’s while under Japanese colonial rule. She was surprised she didn’t know many of these people, and wanted to give them a place. She found the candid images haunting, and began coming up with narratives in her head to fill in the blanks on their stories. She ultimately decided to give the photos new life by merging her and her grandfathers images to give them new stories guided by her vision. The work is stunning and inspires me to rework my own grandfathers photos from the early 1900’s.

Soomin Ham’s website is linked here.


#47

Alec Soth

Anna. Kentfield, California. From "I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating" (2019). Alec Soth

Anna. Kentfield, California. From "I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating" (2019). Alec Soth

With a title like “I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating" it’s only appropriate that my heart beats madly for Alec Soth’s images from his newest photo book. After taking some time off from portraiture, Soth comes back with this stunning set of images meant to be personal, and tender. Soth believes in photographs connecting us, and he spent time with his subjects to achieve this. It was important to him that he was invited to see what makes these people tick rather than trying to pick it out of them. It’s due to this authenticity that these photos and their subjects hit so close to my heart.

More of Alec Soth’s work can be found here.

#46

Felipe Jacome

José Arias walked for 3 days to reach the Berlín highland, the highest and coldest point in the migrant route out of Venezuela. Felipe Jacome

José Arias walked for 3 days to reach the Berlín highland, the highest and coldest point in the migrant route out of Venezuela. Felipe Jacome

“Berlin: The Venezuelan Exodus Through Colombia’s Highlands” is a series of portraits by Felipe Jacome that depict Venezuelan migrants fleeing their country. While not gory or even overtly sad looking at first, this set of images is heart-wrenching. I know quite a few people from Venezuela that study here at school with me, and to think that this could be them is a real wake up call. The pain in the eyes of these people demands to be felt.

Please check out more of Filepe’s amazing work on his website.

#45

Adam Ferguson

Daisy Ward, an Aboriginal-Australian elder from Warakurna Community, sits for a portrait at a ‘sorry place’ near Warakurna Community, Ngaanyatjarraku Shire, Western Australia on Mar. 8, 2017. Adam Ferguson

Daisy Ward, an Aboriginal-Australian elder from Warakurna Community, sits for a portrait at a ‘sorry place’ near Warakurna Community, Ngaanyatjarraku Shire, Western Australia on Mar. 8, 2017. Adam Ferguson

Adam Ferguson’s series “Big Sky: Portraits from the Outback” is extremely intriguing to me as he documents the decline of a culture not known to very many. The Australian outback is a very harsh place that only the toughest can conquer. Especially due to drought that has rocked the outback for the past 6 years. Through this work we can see many parallels to the American South in terms of lifestyle, and get the smallest glimpse in the few people living in one of the most relentless places on earth.

More of Ferguson’s work can be found by clicking here.

#44

Mustafa Hassona

KHAN YUNIS, GAZA - APRIL 6: A Palestinian demonstrator escapes heavy smoke as Israeli soldiers fire several gas bombs during his participation in the 'Great March of Return,' despite Israel's threats near the Gaza-Israel border in Khan Yunis, Gaza on April 06, 2018. Demonstration against Israel's blockade of the Gaza Strip started taking place 11 years ago. Mustafa Hassona/Anadolu Agency

KHAN YUNIS, GAZA - APRIL 6: A Palestinian demonstrator escapes heavy smoke as Israeli soldiers fire several gas bombs during his participation in the 'Great March of Return,' despite Israel's threats near the Gaza-Israel border in Khan Yunis, Gaza on April 06, 2018. Demonstration against Israel's blockade of the Gaza Strip started taking place 11 years ago. Mustafa Hassona/Anadolu Agency

Mustafa Hassona is a Palestinian photographer who has been documenting the protests at the Israeli / Palestinian boarder. Out of all the war photography I’ve ever seen, Mustafa’s hits me the hardest. Crisp lighting, wide angle lenses, and being right in the middle of the action, he brings us to the boarder with him and shows us first hand what it’s like to be on the front lines.

#43

Anupam Diwan

Untitled. Anupam Diwan

Untitled. Anupam Diwan

Inspired by a childhood memory that came back to him during his engineering studies, Anupam Diwan’s series “Fireflies” is a dark and moody tale fueled by his desire to portray a fleeting memory that impacted him so greatly. Switching his entire life path to create work about the details of his life, Diwan takes us into a world all his own. Like fireflies in the night his subjects pop out of the darkness and evoke a wide range of emotions.

Click here to see more of Anupam Diwan’s work.

#42

Marinka Masseus

Chosen [Not] To Be. Marinka Masséus

Chosen [Not] To Be. Marinka Masséus

Marinka Masseus’ series “Chosen [Not] To Be” is part of the Radical Beauty Project which is an international photography initiative to give people with Down Syndrome “their rightful place in the visual arts”. Masseus beautifully portrays her subjects with the utmost care and humanity. Growing up with an aunt with Down Syndrome I’ve always seen them, and anyone with any form of disability, the same as anyone else. I highly appreciate the tenderness and care put into this series, and believe just as it’s time for marginalized groups such as the LGBTQ+ community, and POC, to get the recognition they deserve, so is it time for those with Down Syndrome and other disabilities.

I encourage you to check out more of Marinka Masseus’ work here.

#41

Tariq Zaidi

Maxim, 43, has been a sapeur since he was seven years old. He mixes labels such as Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin and Christian Dior with suits that he has designed and made himself. Now married with two children, he teaches others the art of how to dress elegantly. Brazzaville, Republic of the Congo. Tariq Zaidi

Maxim, 43, has been a sapeur since he was seven years old. He mixes labels such as Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin and Christian Dior with suits that he has designed and made himself. Now married with two children, he teaches others the art of how to dress elegantly. Brazzaville, Republic of the Congo. Tariq Zaidi

La Sape, which stands for Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes (Society of Ambiance Makers and Elegant People) is a fashion subculture in the cities of Kinshasa, Brazzaville, and DRC in the Republic of the Congo. Tariq Zaidi’s series “The Sapeurs of Brazzaville” shows these “sapeurs” expressing themselves through fashion. I find this series quite impactful as most people wouldn’t associate elegance and fashion with the Congo in the heart of Africa. Zaidi juxtaposes his subjects with the less than fashionable city scapes of this area, peaking interest and showing that there is more to these places than what first meets the eye.

Tariq Zaidi’s website is linked here.

Journal of 50 Artists Round 2 (Part 2)

If you aren’t aware of what this project is and would like to know more please click here to see the first time I did this project and here if you would like to start from the beginning of this second version.

#40

David Denil

Twins, from the series "LET US NOT FALL ASLEEP WHILE WALKING". David Denil

Twins, from the series "LET US NOT FALL ASLEEP WHILE WALKING". David Denil

I just found my new favorite photographer. David Denil’s series “LET US NOT FALL ASLEEP WHILE WALKING” is everything I aspire to become someday. In this series he documents the Euromaiden Revolution in Ukraine that is still going on today, 5 years after its start in 2014. His style of documenting is mystifying, cinematic, and filled with meaning. My passion project would be going to these types of places and making my surreal art with the people there that tell their story. It is so encouraging and surprising to see someone creating in the way that I dream of.

Please click here and check out more of David Denil’s work.

#39

Alex Vasyliev

Buildings in Yakutsk are constructed on stilts because of the permafrost. Stilts are needed to prevent the house’s heat from melting the permafrost. Alex Vasyliev

Buildings in Yakutsk are constructed on stilts because of the permafrost. Stilts are needed to prevent the house’s heat from melting the permafrost. Alex Vasyliev

Alex Vasilyev lives in the Sakha Republic in western Russia. This region is largely unexplored and gets, you guessed it, extremely cold. The cold winters do balance out with warm summers, and Vasilyev’s work aims to show both sides. The extreme winter months that leave the population inside for most of their time, and summers when things liven up. I can relate to Vasilyev’s desire to express himself through his photography while he feels isolated in a sparsely populated region.

Alex Vasilyev’s website can be found here.

#38

Julia Fullerton

Tower Bridge. Julia Fullerton-Batten

Tower Bridge. Julia Fullerton-Batten

Julia Fullerton’s work is breathtaking. In her latest series “Old Father Thames” she creates cinematic scenes that depict historical events, stories and lore that surround the Thames River in London. I appreciate the historical accuracy, whimsy, and wonder that Fullerton employs in this set of photos and one can see it throughout all her bodies of work.

Check out more of Julia Fullerton’s fantastical imagery here.

#37

Tong Lam

A lone migrant worker playing with his mobile device. Tong Lam

A lone migrant worker playing with his mobile device. Tong Lam

One of my favorite things about photography is it’s ability to relate foreign places and problems to any viewer. Tong Lam’s series “Where There Is No Room For Fiction” depicts the crumbling urbanized village of Xiam surrounded by the sprawling city of Guangzhou in China. Guangzhou is rapidly expanding in technology, size, and influence and is illegally demolishing and encroaching in upon Xiam. Tong’s photos show a resilient community of land owners and migrant workers who’s way of life is being threatened by growing infrastructure.

More of Tong Lam’s work can be found here.

#36

Sayuri Ichida

Sayuri Ichida

Sayuri Ichida

I’ve always admired photos of dancers as they know how to move their bodies in the most elegant ways. Their complete control of every part of their body allows for beautiful compositions and their artistic inclination allows them to portray emotion in ways others can’t. In Sayuri Ichida’s series “Mayu” she uses fellow Japanese immigrant Mayu as a means of conveying the surprising and jolting experiences that they both found on their respective journeys to America.

Click here for more of Sayuri Ichida’s work.

#35

Matjaz Krivic

Winter Testing of EVs. Matjaz Krivic

Winter Testing of EVs. Matjaz Krivic

Lithium is an element used in all electronics and is one of the most in demand metals of our day and age. Matjaz Krivic captures what the process of mining this important metal, it’s affects on technology, and how our need for it is shaping our world.

Dive into more of Matjaz Krivic’s work here.

#34

Andrew O’Carroll

17_Andrew_OCarroll.jpg

Mostafa. From the series "Take me to my home." Andrew O'Carroll

Andrew O’Carroll’s series “Take Me To My Home” documents the Hotel City Plaza, a place of refuge for squatters in Greece. O’Carroll’s photographs share a closer look at a group of displaced people, asking them to write cards on how they were feeling or what they were thinking as they were living in this run down place. The raw emotion that is portrayed throughout this series is stunning, and sheds light on a population of people who would otherwise remain voiceless.

Check out more of Andrew O’Carroll’s work here.

#33

Marc Ohrem-Leclef

18_Marc_Ohrem.jpg

“Jugaad: Of Intimacy and Love” by Marc Ohrem-Leclef is one of the most moving projects I’ve seen. Documenting and interviewing same-sex couples in India, he shows a side of Indian people that they must hide from the world. Reading the stories and seeing the portraits of these people really puts into perspective the saying that “love is love” and that true, deep, passionate love can be found in many different places. One man wrote that gay men in Indian feel most themselves at dusk (when they cruise in public without worry of humiliation) and that at this time is when he told his mother that he was gay. In his language they don’t even have a word for ‘gay’ and in telling her he had to explain that he was ‘in love with a man’. We take for granted the acceptance we have here in America, and seeing these people and their stories side by side really puts that in perspective.

To see more of Marc Ohrem-Leclef’s work please click here.

#32

Rafael Soldi

From the series “Sentiment.” Rafael Soldi

From the series “Sentiment.” Rafael Soldi

Sentiment” by Rafael Soldi addresses the photographer’s own experiences of childhood playground hazing and how that lead to his understanding of his sexuality and ultimately his differences from other kids. I think this topic is one that is extremely relevant to anyone within the LGBTQ+ community, and his portrayal of intimacy among men is different than others I’ve seen. There’s a tenderness, reservation, and whim to Soldi’s work that I believe paints a clear picture of his past and his message. Soldi addresses his identity and what makes him him in this work. Something we could all work towards honing in on.

More of Rafael Soldi’s work can be found here.

#31

Yoshiki Hase

Ena 035. Yoshiki Hase

Ena 035. Yoshiki Hase

Seclusion can manifest many different outcomes but most often the people that live this was are eccentric. Yoshiki Hase mystifies the viewer with his series “Ena”, by highlighting the quirkiness of the inhabitants of this rural town in the Japanese countryside. By showing the personalities of it’s residents, Hase creates a world understood by no one, but also one that intrigues every viewer.

More of Yoshiki Hase’s work can be found here.

Journal of 50 Artists Round 2 (Part 3)

If you aren’t aware of what this project is and would like to know more please click here to see the first time I did this project and here if you would like to start from the beginning of this second version.

#30

Barbara Peacock

Mark - age 66. “I hold onto life day by day with dialysis. I can’t bear the thought of leaving my family. My will to live is stronger than to die, at least for today.” Knox, Maine. Barbara Peacock

Mark - age 66. “I hold onto life day by day with dialysis. I can’t bear the thought of leaving my family. My will to live is stronger than to die, at least for today.” Knox, Maine. Barbara Peacock

Barbara Peacock does exactly what I’ve always wanted to do with her series “American Bedroom”. Photographing people in their rooms has been something I’ve been interested in for a long time, and to see the breadth of work in this series is exhilarating. Peacock does not stick to one type of person, but rather shows a wide variety of walks of life in this work. By showing these intimate, personal settings, she exposes a side of a person that only they see, their quiet place, their getaway. It is an honor to look at these images.

More of Barbara Peacock’s work can be found by clicking here.

#29

Elena Ansosova

From the series ‘Out of the Way’”. Elena Anosova

From the series ‘Out of the Way’”. Elena Anosova

The most exciting part of Elena Anosova’s work to me is the idea that she is writing her family’s history. Three hundred years her ancestors settled in northern Russia and assimilated with the natives there to found a small village. Coming from a city herself, she dives into her family’s history and culture to create this series of work revolving around the community that her blood erected. That exploration of past and present manifests itself in intriguing works that highlight history and struggle.

Click here for more work by Elena Anosova.

#28

Max Pinckers

From the series ‘Lotus’ . Max Pinckers and Quinten De Bruyn

From the series ‘Lotus’ . Max Pinckers and Quinten De Bruyn

Max Pinckers challenges documentary and fine art photography. He aims to have his photos speak for themselves without any trace of the photographer. Often using some sort of staging Pinckers wants anyone to be able to interpret his images, even without some sort of conceptual background. He believes all photography should be consumed with skepticism and hopes that his work does that for others.

Max Pinckers’ website can be found here.

#27

Hashem Shakeri

Hossein, a 13-year-old boy, is from Boris, Chaabahar. The natives in Boris are the oldest residents in Chaabahar. People of Boris live in hardship, poverty, and famine. However, most of the residents in Zabol, especially farmers and livestock breeders, after seeing their farms dried and their livestock lost, have decided to move to the tourist city, Chaabahr, which suffers from lack of water. Hashem Shakeri

Hossein, a 13-year-old boy, is from Boris, Chaabahar. The natives in Boris are the oldest residents in Chaabahar. People of Boris live in hardship, poverty, and famine. However, most of the residents in Zabol, especially farmers and livestock breeders, after seeing their farms dried and their livestock lost, have decided to move to the tourist city, Chaabahr, which suffers from lack of water. Hashem Shakeri

In his series “An Elegy for the Death of Hamun”, Hashem Shakeri shows us the ever declining area that once was home to Lake Hamun. The lake has all but dried up, and with it went the surrounding civilization. Poverty and addiction plague this area, and what was once a region teaming with life is now hanging by a thread. These stories give life to the people experiencing hardship, and I can’t help but feel that we owe it to them to at least listen.

More of Hashem Shakeri’s work here.

#26

George-Marazakis

From the series “A Cure for Anthropocene”. George Marazakis

From the series “A Cure for Anthropocene”. George Marazakis

George Marazakis’ series “A Cure for Anthropocene” brings a social message from a view point we rarely see. When we look at climate change and our pollution of our planet we often see animals in oil spills or excessive plastic in our seas. Marazakis wants to show these changes in more subtle ways such as a shift in our atmosphere or the way our horizons change. This subtle look elicits a more subconscious response , and poses real questions about how we want our world to look.

Check out George Marazakis’ website here.

#25

Niko J. Kallianiotis

Rain Drop. Niko J. Kallianiotis

Rain Drop. Niko J. Kallianiotis

America in a Trance” by Niko J. Kallianiotis highlights the political, social, and economic climate in small town America. I found that this series very eloquently describes the overall state of America right now, and that, as the title suggests, that description details a divided country that is in it’s own world.

More of Niko Kallianiotis’ work here.

#24

Michal Iwanowski

From the series "Go Home, Polish" . Michal Iwanowski

From the series "Go Home, Polish" . Michal Iwanowski

To create his series “Go Home, Polish”, Michal Iwanowski walked 1800 km from Cardiff, where he was living at the time, to his hometown of Mokrzeszów in Poland. Brexit had just occurred and as someone who felt home in both the UK and a country still within the EU, Iwanowski felt disconnected. So, to combat this he walked to his home country and documented along the way. His 105 day long journey shows many different exhilarating scenes and different walks of life.

Click here for Michal Iwanowski’s website.

#23

Sara Teigan

From the series "Interior Landscape" . Sara S. Teigen

From the series "Interior Landscape" . Sara S. Teigen

Sara Teigan’s alternative work is stunning. The process is therapeutic for her. Something I cannot relate to whatsoever. However, by drawing and sketching her thoughts, Teigen grounds herself in the present, feeling the wonder that comes with experiencing something new for the very first time, and the result is breathtaking.

You can find Teigan’s website here.

#22

Pixy Liao

Start Your Day With A Good Breakfast Together, 2007. Pixy Liao

Start Your Day With A Good Breakfast Together, 2007. Pixy Liao

Pixy Liao’s series “Experimental Relationship” is quirky but moving. She started using her boyfriend as a “prop” for her photos, however that turned into a 12 year long project that documents their unconventional relationship. This work is magnificent and is riddled with symbolism and story.

Check out more of Pixy Liao’s work here.

#21

Andras Ladocsi

From the series "Swallow" . András Ladocsi

From the series "Swallow" . András Ladocsi

András Ladocsi’s series “Swallow” has just the right amount of tension. Ladocsi’s inspiration for this series was his particular understanding of how we present ourselves differently in different situations. Molding ourselves into whatever we deem appropriate at the time. The particular period in his life that he channeled when creating this work is when he was a swimmer in his youth. He speaks of balancing many personalities from hyper masculine to tender loving member of the family. The series highlights there by focusing on the moments in between, when switching from personality to personality.

More from András Ladocsi can be found here.

Journal of 50 Artists Round 2 (Part 4)

If you aren’t aware of what this project is and would like to know more please click here to see the first time I did this project and here if you would like to start from the beginning of this second version.

#20

Colby Tarsitano

From the series "Querida Cuba" . Colby Tarsitano

From the series "Querida Cuba" . Colby Tarsitano

#19

Elliott Verdier

From the series “A Shaded Path” . Elliott Verdier

From the series “A Shaded Path” . Elliott Verdier

#18

Cate Wnek

Untitled. Cate Wnek

Untitled. Cate Wnek

#17

Amy Friend

Water Orrery. Amy Friend

Water Orrery. Amy Friend

#16

Tabitha Barnard

Precious Blood. Tabitha Barnard.

Precious Blood. Tabitha Barnard.

#15

Florian Ruiz

0,359Bq. Florian Ruiz

0,359Bq. Florian Ruiz

#14

Tomeu Coll

Badlands, South Mallorca Island. Tomeu Coll

Badlands, South Mallorca Island. Tomeu Coll

#13

Lucia Herrero

Tribes 10. Lucia Herrero

Tribes 10. Lucia Herrero

#12

Gregory Halpern

From "Confederate Moons". Gregory Halpern

From "Confederate Moons". Gregory Halpern

#11

Alessia Rollo

Fata Morgana #3 . Alessia Rollo

Fata Morgana #3 . Alessia Rollo

Journal of 50 Artists Round 2 (Part 5)

If you aren’t aware of what this project is and would like to know more please click here to see the first time I did this project and here if you would like to start from the beginning of this second version.

#10

Dylan Hausthor

Water to Wine. Dylan Hausthor

Water to Wine. Dylan Hausthor

Dylan Hausthor’s series “Wilted” is about a wildly dramatic and outlandish story that happened to his friend. “‘She set it ablaze out of spite, simultaneously provoked by gossip while inciting more gossip herself,’ he explains. After a few minutes of standing there, observing the flames lick up the sides of the structure, the woman felt her water break – she was going into labour early. ‘She ran across the street to the property owner’s house, demanding a ride to the hospital while the result of her arson was a backdrop of smoking proof behind her.’” (From LensCulture’s article on this series). The drama and emotion of the story inspired Hausthor and thus “Wilted” was born.

More of Hausthor’s work can be found here.

#9

Kensuke Koike

From the project “No More, No Less.” Altered gelatin silver print . Kensuke Koike & Thomas Sauvin

From the project “No More, No Less.” Altered gelatin silver print . Kensuke Koike & Thomas Sauvin

Rummaging through stacks of old photographs at flea markets, photographer Kensuke Koike is endlessly inspired by neglected objects from the past. Finding novel ways to bring new life to discarded relics, he affectionately alters vintage photographs, injecting them with new meaning. After he finds a photo he likes, Koike carefully cuts into the image, rearranging the pieces and turning the photograph into an abstracted, interactive optical illusion that invites his viewers to do a double-take. These reformulated objects make up his series Single Image Processing, a project Koike describes in simple terms: “Vintage prints, nothing added, nothing removed.”

Check out more of Kensuke Koike’s work here.

#8

Karol Palka

Closed holiday facility once owned by the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia. © Karol Palka

Closed holiday facility once owned by the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia. © Karol Palka

“During the Cold War, a series of Central and Eastern European countries aligned with the USSR made up the Eastern Bloc. These socialist states (the countries of the Warsaw Pact) included Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, and Romania. This photo series documents the remnants of these socialist states in the present day.” - Karol Palka for Lensculture.

The forgotten world that Karol Palka photographs for her series “Edifice” is almost a scary representation of what our society at large could become in a matter of years if we don’t start working together.

More of Palka’s lovely work can be found here.

#7

Paul D’Amato

Girl with Little Princess Disney Mask. Paul D’Amato

Girl with Little Princess Disney Mask. Paul D’Amato

#6

Sara Angelucci

Woman/Winter/Forest. Inkjet print, 2016. Sara Angelucci

Woman/Winter/Forest. Inkjet print, 2016. Sara Angelucci

#5

R.J. Kern

From the series “Out to Pasture”. R. J. Kern

From the series “Out to Pasture”. R. J. Kern

#4

Pamela Littky

Cimarron, Kansas, 2015. Pamela Littky

Cimarron, Kansas, 2015. Pamela Littky

#3

Kimmo Metsaranta

Notes on a Place #4. Kimmo Metsäranta

Notes on a Place #4. Kimmo Metsäranta

#2

Stephanie Gengotti

Zoran, 10, and Zia, 13, travel with their family to festivals and performances all over Europe. Here, they are rehearsing for a small show they will play for their parents. Avignon, France, 2017. From "Circus Love, Les Pêcheurs de Rêves. Chapter 2." Stephanie Gengotti

Zoran, 10, and Zia, 13, travel with their family to festivals and performances all over Europe. Here, they are rehearsing for a small show they will play for their parents. Avignon, France, 2017. From "Circus Love, Les Pêcheurs de Rêves. Chapter 2." Stephanie Gengotti

#1

Aleksi Poutanen

From “Fellow Creatures”. Aleksi Poutanen

From “Fellow Creatures”. Aleksi Poutanen

Journal of 50 Artists (Part 5)

Last one coming up! Is everyone ready? If you don't know about this project and would like to know more please click here. Otherwise here we go!

#10

Josué Rivas

Rivas, Josué. Great Spirit. 2016

Rivas, Josué. Great Spirit. 2016

One of the best ways to make an impact in the world you live in is to document it. That's exactly what Josué Rivas did at the Standing Rock Reservation. Rivas documented the struggles of the people there, but also their livelihood. He humanized them in a beautiful way that can only help their cause. This photo in particular is stunning, the backlighting sets the focus right on the chief and you can't help but take him seriously because of it. He appears grand and powerful, wise beyond his years. The details in the shadows of his clothing are superb as well and highlight the garb he is wearing furthering the idea that he has status and merit. He has a voice, they have a voice, we have a voice.

#9

Richard Renaldi

Renaldi, Richard. From the series "Manhattan Sunday".

Renaldi, Richard. From the series "Manhattan Sunday".

In his series "Manhattan Sunday," Richard Renaldi explores Manhattan in the early hours of Sunday till morning. He primarily focuses on those having to do with night life whether it be couples or dancers or club goers. It's a highly personal project that sort of explores the scenes he was a part of when he was younger and lead to an AIDS diagnosis later in life. The photos feel like they're from an outsiders perspective looking in just as he is an outsider from that lifestyle he once lived now observing those deep within it.

Renaldi's website is here.

#8

Jadwiga Brontē 

Brontē, Jadwiga. No Privacy. 2015

Brontē, Jadwiga. No Privacy. 2015

Jadwiga Brontē spent 2 years documenting places in Belarus that house children and adults that are thought too different or disabled to take part in normal society. The way these beds are captured is so symbolic of these people's struggles in this place. They have no privacy, autonomy, or sense of the outside world. 

Catch more of Jadwiga Brontē's work here.

#7

Tony Vaccaro

Vaccaro, Tony. The ruins of Cassino. 1946.

Vaccaro, Tony. The ruins of Cassino. 1946.

Sent off to Europe during WWII Vaccaro aimed to document the war in a real way. The common way that war was portrayed was staged and unrealistic. He shot during the days and developed his film at night inside army helmets. A true hero he showed the horrors of war but also the tender moments and the juxtaposition of these.

More of Tony Vaccaro's work here.

#6

David Carol

Carol, David. Gorilla. 2015

Carol, David. Gorilla. 2015

David Carol's "No Plan B," series is all about the unexpected. He travels on road trips across the country documenting things that stick out to him. He attempts to organize the chaos of the world, and the road, with his photographs.

More of Carol's work can be found here.

#5

Robert Cumming

Cumming, Richard. Fisherman + Boat Out of Water for Repairs; “Jaws” Attraction Area on Universal Studios Tour.  1977.

Cumming, Richard. Fisherman + Boat Out of Water for Repairs; “Jaws” Attraction Area on Universal Studios Tour.  1977.

Richard Cumming's work is all about the idea of depiction vs. deception. He loves to play around and take advantage of the fact that a single capture can do both of these things. One thing that makes Cumming's work unique is that he doesn't try to hide the fact that he's tricking you. He never quite completes his illusions so they are easy to see through.

Fr more of Cumming's work click here

#4

Shen Wei

Wei, Shen. Peach Tree. 2014.

Wei, Shen. Peach Tree. 2014.

Shen Wei captures the elegance of flora against a black background with high contrast. This emphasizes all of the characteristics and details of each flower. The elegance and grace of each piece is entrapping. 

Shen Wei's website here.

#3

Jeff Mikkelson

Mikkelson, Jeff. Liquid Dreams. 

Mikkelson, Jeff. Liquid Dreams. 

I admire Jeff Mikkelson's control over color and lighting. Each photo in his "Liquid Dreams," series is incredibly crafted. I also adore the look on each of the model's faces. So clams and serene even though you know that must not have been comfortable. Surprising and different this series is gorgeous and excites the eye.

Mikkelson's work can be found here.

#2

Donald R. Blumberg

Blumberg, Donald. Untitled. 1968-1969.

Blumberg, Donald. Untitled. 1968-1969.

Donald Blumberg takes a jab at media and news with his project "This Just In,". Using art as a means of propaganda makes a statement about the news industry and how Americans receive and interpret their news.

#1

Colin McRae

McRae, Colin. Rainbow Fields.

McRae, Colin. Rainbow Fields.

Colin McRae's landscapes are nothing short of magical. He transports you to a whole new world and I couldn't be happier to go there. His leading lines and sharp colors make your eyes dart and flow all around his photos. Although the colors are saturated and intense, I still feel a sense of calmness looking at his photos.

More from McRae is here.

Journal of 50 Artists (Part 4)

If you don't know what this is about please feel free to visit my first post by clicking here. Otherwise prepared to be inspired!

#20

Mary Ellen Mark

Mark, Mary Ellen. Maharaja of Udaipur and his dog. 1996.

Mark, Mary Ellen. Maharaja of Udaipur and his dog. 1996.

In this series called "Man and Beast: Photos from Mexico and India" Mary Ellen Mark documents people of different cultures and their relationships with animals. It's quite interesting to compare cultures in such a way. Their relationships to things that aren't culture bound. Either way, Mark captures a wide variety of images in this series. Some literal animals, others "beasts". 

Check out Mary Ellen Mark's work here.

#19

Greg Miller

Miller, Greg. Untitled. 1999

Miller, Greg. Untitled. 1999

Greg Miller isn't very religious, however he's always had an interesting relationship with faith. That is what brought about the idea to start photographing people on Ash Wednesday. His grandmother struggled with her faith when her husband passed away. Ever since he was very interested in people who visibly shared their faith. He has been photographing people on Ash Wednesday for 20 years now.

#18

Nir Arieli

Arieli, Nir. Taner.

Arieli, Nir. Taner.

Nir Arieli was a military photographer in Israel until he got a scholarship to go to SVA in New York where he did a series of male dancers showing the flaws in their skin. He used a special type of infrared light to show these "flaws". In doing so he shows that even these men aren't "perfect". They push their bodies to crazy limits and are successful in what they do. They don't need perfect skin and they don't have it.

#17

 Amy Touchette

Touchette, Amy. Leaving Home. 

Touchette, Amy. Leaving Home. 

It's always the photographers that get personal that produce the best work. Amy Touchette followed the life of a New York City burlesque dancer and documented it along the way. This shot is gold. The contrast and illumination from the door suggests hope for a career to come in the future. She looks hurried, she may be late, trying to get that big shot. The stairwell is poorly lit and looks old, maybe not the best area so she doesn't have a lot of money... So much goes into these photos once a photographer gets the inside scoop with the subject. Touchette steps outside the boundaries and breaks down barriers to be authentic with her work and it comes across powerfully.

If you'd like to see more of Amy Touchette's work click here

#16

Yana Toyber

Toyber, Yana. From the series "Rebirth".

Toyber, Yana. From the series "Rebirth".

Yana Toyber wanted to explore people's reactions to going under water for brief periods at a time. The idea of capturing people's individual reactions to the same thing is genius. It shows us that we are all different in ways beyond the physical. Some people in the series were calm, others uncomfortable, some panicked. It's almost a study on human nature and for that I believe that this series is extremely successful.

Head over to Yana Toyber's website by clicking here.

#15

Ricky Chapman

Chapman, Ricky. Laura McDaniel. 2012

Chapman, Ricky. Laura McDaniel. 2012

Ricky Chapman decided that in this age of image editing software that it was time to take a step back. He chose to do a series where there was only two photos taken. No retouching, no reshooting. I can relate to this mindset greatly right now. After moving into the darkroom this past quarter I feel as though I have a much better appreciation for everything I shoot. I take more time, think more, and have more to say. I applaud Chapman and think his project has come out beautiful.

Check out more of Ricky Chapman's here.

#14

Kim Carrier

Carrier, Kim. Pages of the Past. 

Carrier, Kim. Pages of the Past. 

Another self portrait artist, Kim Carrier uses self portraiture as an ongoing diary for herself. She believes the best way for her to keep all her memories of all the things that she experiences is to take self portraits. This captures the moments for her and brings out things she might otherwise have forgotten. 

More of Kim Carrier's work can be found here.

#13

Lee Materazzi

Materazzi, Lee. Hiding Under My Mother's Dress. 2011

Materazzi, Lee. Hiding Under My Mother's Dress. 2011

Lee Materazzi takes photos that make your head scratch. At first glance all appears as it should, but upon further inspection you notice it. Materazzi aims to manipulate the mundane in life, playing off the idea that we are so comfortable with the ordinary we tend to tune out the nuances in our day to day. Materazzi wants to highlight those nuances and make people more aware of them.

If you want to see more of Lee Materazzi's work check out her website here.

#12

Jim Jocoy

Jocoy, Jim. Sarah Lee in my Bathroom. 1978

Jocoy, Jim. Sarah Lee in my Bathroom. 1978

Jim Jocoy was photographing in and around San Fransisco in the beginning of the west coast's punk phase. He documented his friends lives of playing music and making art. It's these kinds of works that give us a glimpse into the lives of people who lived during those times. Since he was shooting his friends, the moments were authentic, the feelings real. I think that's what gives his work the appeal.

If you're interested in more of Jim Jocoy's work click here.

#11

Sarah C Butler

Butler, Sarah C. Sprouts on Stove.

Butler, Sarah C. Sprouts on Stove.

"Frozen in Time" is Sarah C. Butler's new book of photos dedicated to trying to make peace with her deceased mother's house. It's a beautiful exploration of the feelings associated with an old ugly house that lives on after your loved one. Sarah's work with highlights and shadows heighten these feelings of grief. 

More from Sarah C. Butler can be found here.

One more blog post coming up! Thanks for reading hope you're inspired.

Journal of 50 Artists (Part 3)

Back with another 10 for my journal of 50 artists! If you would like to know more about this project or want to check out either of the first two parts to this journal you can click here for the first post and here for the second.

#30

Richard Avedon

Avedon, Richard. Mental Institution #9, East Louisiana State Mental Hospital, February 15th 1963.

Avedon, Richard. Mental Institution #9, East Louisiana State Mental Hospital, February 15th 1963.

Richard Avedon was one of the most influential photographers that ever lived. He not only shot some of the most famous people and events of his time, but he also took photos of the more difficult things, such as the photo pictured above. A great photographer is versatile, and although he may keep up with the times, he has to create meaningful work as well and Avedon did just that.

You can find more of Richard Avedon's work here.

#29

Annie Leibovitz

Leibovitz, Annie. Demi Moore, Culver City, California. 1991

Leibovitz, Annie. Demi Moore, Culver City, California. 1991

What would a list of important artists be without Annie Leibovitz? A true icon of modern portraiture Annie always gets the shot. The above shot of Demi Moore dating back to 1991 was extremely scandalous for the time, but Annie had been breaking boundaries long before that and continues to do so now. Leibovitz will take whatever photo she feels is best and she knows what the best is. She has shot nearly every big name celebrity there is, and there's reason for that.

#28

Pieter Hugo

Hugo, Pieter. Portrait #12 Rowanda. 2015

Hugo, Pieter. Portrait #12 Rowanda. 2015

This artist holds a special place in my heart. When I cam upon Pieter Hugo's series "1994" tears instantly welled up in my eyes. I've known what my ultimate goal was in my career for about a year now, and this project is so near to where my passion lies. In his project Hugo photographs children from South Africa and Rowanda that have been born since 1994 which was a dramatic year for both countries. In South Africa, that spring, the first multicultural elections were held. In Rowanda, 1994 started a mass genocide that resulted in close to 1 million deaths in 100 days. Hugo photographs these children because they are free from this history but still somehow bound by it. His photos almost look like they came out of an unsettling fairytale. I have a project in mind that falls along the same lines as this series does and it hit home to see it done so beautifully.

Here's a link to Pieter Hugo's website.

#27

Rania Matar

Matar, Rania. Maryam 9, Beirut Lebanon. 2011.

Matar, Rania. Maryam 9, Beirut Lebanon. 2011.

Rania Matar photographs young girls in both the U.S. and the Middle East. She chooses girls that are "Becoming" hence the title of her series. These young girls are growing up and becoming women, and Matar explores what that looks like and means to different places and different cultures. She asks her subjects not to smile and lets them naturally work out their posing. She uses medium format film, so the girls can't see their photos instantly, these things she believes helps her achieve her goal in photographing these young women in their most raw form.

#26

Camila Svenson

Svenson, Camila. From the series "you will never walk alone".

Svenson, Camila. From the series "you will never walk alone".

There is something so incredibly powerful about art that speaks to your own life experiences. Growing up in rural Maine I can completely relate to Camila Svenson's series "you will never walk alone". All about Icelandic children transitioning through their teen years in their small town, Svenson would photograph the kids in groups or alone, and always in their every day activities. This photo stuck out to me because it reminds me of drives back home with my sister. Coming from such a small place there wasn't really ever much to do, so to get quality time with someone sometimes we would just go for car rides through the mountains. To be able to relate so strongly with the subject matter of this series is beautiful.

To find more of Camila Svenson's work, visit her website here.

#25

J. Shotti

J. Shotti. Image from "Every Two Weeks". 2014.

J. Shotti. Image from "Every Two Weeks". 2014.

In his series "EVERY TWO WEEKS" J. Shotti used his polaroid camera to document people who he came in contact with for the course of two weeks. Sometimes a concept can make a photo so much stronger. Of course there is a story behind this photo regardless, but with a good project and mission behind a series you can't help but want to see more. Did he spend more time with this fellow? Who else did he meet? Who did the guy in this photo meet during those two weeks? So many questions can arise with the right type or project and this one is extremely interesting because we all obviously come in contact with a lot of people in a week, but how many of them do we remember? 

Check out more from this series (there are a LOT of photos) on J. Shotti's website by clicking here.

#24

Dennis Stock

Stock, Dennis. Bill Crow, New York City. 1958

Stock, Dennis. Bill Crow, New York City. 1958

Dennis Stock took photos of many famous people such as James Dean, Audrey Hepburn, and Miles Davis. What makes someone great though? It can't just be the people that they shoot, there has to be more. This is a question I have been asking myself while doing this project. We all know the names of the greats who've shot EVERYONE but WHY have they shot everyone? What makes them special? Anton Corbjin answered that question about Dennis Stock saying that he regrets never having met the photographer after doing more in depth research into James Dean's life. Since he's found that Stock had a great eye for detail in life and what was around him. Now this is something I can get behind. The above photo exemplifies a moment that might not be captured had it not been for someone who had great attention to detail.

You can find some of Dennis Stock's work here.

#23

Jeremy Kramer

Kramer, Jeremy. from #inverse2014.

Kramer, Jeremy. from #inverse2014.

I'm always interested in what people are doing differently in the studio. Jeremy Kramer takes a different approach to the studio portrait and a sort of spin on the double exposure. This series could have to do with the "real us" and what we let others see. Either way, very creative concept and an over all aesthetically pleasing outcome.

To see more or Jeremy Kramer's work visit his website here.

#22

Olivia Bee

Bee, Olivia. Codependency Before College. 2012

Bee, Olivia. Codependency Before College. 2012

Olivia Bee is a 20 year old photographer from Brooklyn, NY. Her series "Kid's in Love" is a sort of personal diary from her experiences with love from ages 15-20. I think almost anyone can relate to the concept of kids in love however the picture I have chosen to share in this journal is extremely relatable for anyone who has had a relationship at the end of their high school years. The photo's soft focus and lack of contrast creates a sense of wonder and intimacy but her arms around his neck show urgency. All too real feelings for those in love at that time. 

Check out more of Olivia Bee's amazing work on her website.

#21

Youngho Kang

Kang, Youngho. The Dog That Knows Time. 

Kang, Youngho. The Dog That Knows Time. 

Youngho Kang is usually behind the camera shooting for clients like Vouge and Coca-Cola, but int his new series "99 Variations" he's behind the camera for a change. I wanted to put in an artist who took a leap and went behind the camera because I've been feeling like I might need to try that again sometime soon. The art of self portraits is hard to master but I believe you learn a lot about yourself from it. As for Kang, he went behind the camera because even when he's in the studio shooting he finds himself dancing around and getting very involved with his subject. He thought why not become his subject for a change. He believes that in doing this he has gained a better sense of his own identity and that of his work.

That's all for now folks! Thanks again for reading hope you enjoy these.

 

Journal of 50 Artists (Part 2)

I'm back! If you don't know what this is about and want to read my first blog post on this and the first set of 10 artists click here. Otherwise let's just get to it!

#40

Anja Niemi

Niemi, Anja. The Flower Room. 2016

Niemi, Anja. The Flower Room. 2016

When I saw this photo I was instantly drawn to it. Also, the series title reads "The Woman Who Never Existed," with a name like that who could resist looking into it further? In this series Niemi depicts an actress that only really exists when she's in front of an audience. Both artist and model, Niemi becomes the character for her images which gives her a more hands on and up front role in creation. She puts herself in elaborate clothing and backdrops to really set the stage... Get it? Her use of colors and textures are incredible and as a model she does a remarkable job portraying feelings of emptiness. A definite genius in my book.

A link to Anja Niemi's website can be found here

#39

Richard Tuschman

Tuschman, Richard. The Potato Eaters. 2014.

Tuschman, Richard. The Potato Eaters. 2014.

Richard Tuschman tells real stories in a dream like, almost surreal way. In his series titled "One Upon a Time in Kazimierz," Tuschman tells the story of a tailor in a ghetto neighborhood of Krakow, Poland during the 1930's. He uses real models but places them in miniature sets that he creates. In doing so he creates the impossible while telling real life stories that have impact.

More of Richard Tuschman's work can be found here

#38

Karen Rosenthal

Rosenthal, Karin. Reverie. 1988.

Rosenthal, Karin. Reverie. 1988.

It goes without saying that Karin Rosenthal's work is stunning. In her series "Nudes in Water," from which the above photo can be found, she transforms the nude figure by posing it in the most unexpected ways. The reflective and elastic properties of the water are in stark contrast with the smooth and even skin. The nude becomes abstracted in Rosenthal's work, mimicking nature through raw form.

I encourage you to check out the rest of Karen Rosenthal's work here

#37

Ryann Ford

Ford, Ryann. Walker Lake, Nevada - U.S. 95

Ford, Ryann. Walker Lake, Nevada - U.S. 95

I am obsessed with Ryann Ford's series "Rest Stops - Vanishing Relics of the American Roadside," in which she tells the story of forgotten rest stops off from major U.S. highways. All the photos from this series have inviting colors, dynamic lighting, and a picnic table as the general point of focus. The photos make you nostalgic for what once was and curious as to who might have stopped there to take a break from the road.

Ford's website is located here.

#36

Kyohei Abe

Abe, Kyohei. imaginary scape: untitled#9. 2009.

Abe, Kyohei. imaginary scape: untitled#9. 2009.

Vastly different than the other photographers mentioned, Kyohei Abe sets up his photos meticulously. Very precise and calculated he views his photos as designs. He strives to create very clean photographs that have "ambiguous and fictitious environments." Personally his photographs off-put me, there is an emptiness that the negative space in his photos make me feel. The fact that two small (aggressively saturated in color) planes against a neutral background can unsettle me is exactly why I admire Abe's work. Even through simplicity he can create a photograph that moves someone and that is highly remarkable. 

Kyohei Abe's website can be found here.

#35

Svjetlana Tepavcevic

Tepavcevic, Svjetlana. Means of Reproduction no 2011.

Tepavcevic, Svjetlana. Means of Reproduction no 2011.

This piece doesn't need an explanation as to what the reference is to, however the way Tepavcevic glorifies the reproductive organs through different ways nature reproduces itself is classy as well as beautiful. Each piece is lit roughly the same way against the same color background as well, creating a beautiful aesthetic and platform for her expression.

#34

Bear Kirkpatrick

Kirkpatrick, Bear. Ashley 1. 2013.

Kirkpatrick, Bear. Ashley 1. 2013.

Every subject that Bear Kirkpatrick photographs has the most intriguing eyes. The expressions of his models coupled with their clothing and the walls that he puts them in front of for his series "Wallportraits" makes each photo a masterpiece. Kirkpatrick seems to have a way to match his model and subject matter in a cosmic pairing that results in photos you can't take your eyes off from.

More of Bear Kirkpatrick's stunning work can be found here.

#33

Siri Kaur

Kaur, Siri. Charan, Portland, Maine. 2005.

Kaur, Siri. Charan, Portland, Maine. 2005.

Siri Kaur possesses a skill that I admire deeply. That skill is the ability to get a subject to make the most plain "them" face. This is something that I hope to develop over time. Kaur seems to get her subjects to let the wall down, something most have trouble doing with even their closest companions. Each person in her series "Strangers" lets go somehow, whether it be a facial expression, a weird habit, etc. these people so willingly give themselves up to Kaur. I admire this style of photography greatly and hope to someday be able to employ it in my own work.

Catch Siri Kaur's work here.

#32

Marina Edith Calvo

Edith Calvo, Marina. Vibrazione Fatale. 2013

Edith Calvo, Marina. Vibrazione Fatale. 2013

To some, Marina Edith Calvo may be too sinister in subject matter, but for me, her "La Realta' Surreale," series is a fabulously expressive body of work about sexuality and standards of beauty. Her dark style is haunting, and the characters in her photographs do not seem like people you'd want to meet. However if you look carefully you'll see her allusions to modern societal pressures and stigmas about femininity and beauty.

#31

Luigi Ghirri

Ghirri, Luigi. Salisburgo. 1977

Ghirri, Luigi. Salisburgo. 1977

Luigi Ghirri is one of those photographers that you look at their work and just think how you never would have thought to do what he did but somehow it just makes so much sense. His photos are calm and mysterious, like something is off but you can't quite put your finger on it. Extremely progressive for his time Ghirri pushed boundries and made a lasting mark on contemporary photography.

Check back for another 10 artists on the next post! Thanks for reading.

Journal of 50 Artists (Part 1)

Get ready to be inspired!

I'm sure you're wondering what this is, if you're even reading this, seems how I haven't posted on my blog since July 2015 (my first too actually... oops.) Well a lot has changed since then, however my love of photography has not. I now attend the Savannah College of Art and Design working towards a B.F.A in Photography with a concentration in Fine Art Photography (shocker right). Now for my studies I am taking a black and white film class called Black and White Technique and as a part of this class we are required to compile a journal of 50 artists that we find intriguing (hopefully most are photographers). We were given many options of how to do this, whether it be a book, a slide show... a blog post? 

Thus this post was born. In it I aim to highlight some amazing photographers and talk a little bit about their work. Now this won't go in any particular order, just the order that I find them in. Feel free to suggest other artists / photographers that you might like because this doesn't have to be a stagnant list. As artists we need to look to others to see what we like, or don't like, to better understand who we are and what we want to create.

This will come as 5 separate entries and for this first one let's stick to black and white photographers, for no particular reason at all (sarcasm). 

So without further adieu, let's begin with...

#50

Ansel Adams

Adams, Ansel. The Tetons and the Snake River. 1942

Adams, Ansel. The Tetons and the Snake River. 1942

The very first name that comes to my mind, and surely to the minds of many others, is Ansel Adams. I feel as though I never had a true appreciation for this man's genius until I started working in the dark room. I can only imagine the crazy amount of dodging and burning Adams must have done to create the above photo. Somehow he manages to illuminate the scene without the highlights becoming over bearing, as well as has shadows that pull you into the detail. There is no way this scene was even close to as dynamic as he has made it appear through his experienced and dedicated darkroom skills. The drama played out in this piece suggests that the mountains and river work together in some sort of ruling over the land. Royalty and grandiosity are littered in the tones of this photo.

You can find Ansel Adam's website here. 

#49

Sally Mann

Mann, Sally. Candy Cigarette. 1989

Mann, Sally. Candy Cigarette. 1989

Sally Mann is another, more modern day, black and white film photographer. Her photos are generally intimate and extremely expressive. One of her many projects was photographing her children, in whom she captured the perfect combination of pose and whim. In Candy Cigarette in particular, Mann juxtaposes the innocence of a young girl wearing a white dress with a very adult way of holding her candy cigarette. The spotlight affect Mann has chosen heightens the impact of the odd pairing and the two other neglected figures facing away from the subject and the camera add to the mystery of the scene.

Sally Mann's website is here.

#48

Ed van der Elsken

Van der Elsken, Ed. Girl in the Subway, Tokyo. 1984

Van der Elsken, Ed. Girl in the Subway, Tokyo. 1984

Street photography is a form of photography that has always interested me but I haven't tried my luck in. Ed van der Elsken makes me want to change that. His eye for the unique and striking is superb and somehow manages to make the viewer feel like they truly are looking in on a fleeting moment. His attention to details even within the deep blacks draws the eye around his photos incredibly well, but his strong sense of subject matter and eye for the unique keep you grounded within the scene.

Ed van der Elsken's website can be found here.

#47

Linda Foard Roberts

Foard Roberts, Linda. Measure in Time. 2014.

Foard Roberts, Linda. Measure in Time. 2014.

Linda Foard Robert's series "Simple Truths" takes a simple subject matter and makes it anything but... simple. Each one of these works has a weight to it, a strong draw in. Some ways that Roberts achieves this is through a soft focus on much of the image, even sometimes employing a tilt-shift affect. This draws the viewer right into the seemingly "simple" scene where they are greeted by what at first seems like a "simple" subject. The generic quality of each of these subjects however leaves a need to know more, and a way to relate. 

You can check out Linda Foard Robert's website here.

#46

Joseph E. B. Elliott

E.B. Elliott, Joseph. Delaware Station, view looking southwest across roof of the Boiler Houses. 2000-2002

E.B. Elliott, Joseph. Delaware Station, view looking southwest across roof of the Boiler Houses. 2000-2002

Joseph E. B. Elliott takes the old and decrepit and returns it to it's glory with his "Palazzos of Power" series focused on electrical power plants that were once an important part of Philadelphia's economy. The way Elliott captures the magnitude and scale of these ancient urban wastelands exceeds words. The symmetry and scale of the large towers radiates power and dominance. It is clear that plants like these used to run the cities that they were in and we can see that exemplified in Elliott's work. All of the photos are just what they are depicting, powerful.

You can find more of Elliot's work here

#45

Gauri Gill

Gill, Gauri. "Untitled (10)" from the series "annat". 1999-2007

Gill, Gauri. "Untitled (10)" from the series "annat". 1999-2007

Gauri Gill is a beautiful example of documentary photography. Gill's subjects live on in her photos just as they did when she photographed them. The raw quality of her images capture the viewer, whom struggles to interpret the life of another. In this image and a few others from this series, there is a harshly lit sky. Generally one would find this distracting and burn it down, however Gill leaves the sky an off-putting, abrasive, white color, possibly symbolizing some sort of hardship or struggle that bears upon the subjects of the photo.

Check out Gauri Gill's work here.

#44

Brandon Thibodeaux

Thibodeaux, Brandon. Backflip, Duncan, Mississippi. 2011

Thibodeaux, Brandon. Backflip, Duncan, Mississippi. 2011

Brandon Thibodeaux captures life in the south with such ease. Clearly spending time in the places and with the people he photographs, Thibodeaux finds a way to portray some of the most intimate moments of life for those in Mississippi with his series "When Morning Comes". Pictured above is an intriguing glimpse into adolescence for some living in the deep south. Playful and fun, yet many Americans could not imagine growing up in such a place. Thibodeaux's photos are highly charged and to experience his photos is to experience what, in his own words, is "another man's faith, identity, and perseverance".

You can catch more of Brandon Thibodeaux's work here.

#43

Susan Berger

Berger, Susan. MLK Drive, Savannah, GA. 2009

Berger, Susan. MLK Drive, Savannah, GA. 2009

In 2009 Susan Berger set out to photograph streets named after Martin Luther King Jr. Her travels brought her to many different cities and of them one was Savannah. Currently living in Savannah I can say that she picked a very meaningful place on MLK Drive to capture. She could have chosen the run down projects or the hustling downtown but she chose to photograph a sign reading "Revival in Progress" which is what Savannah has been working towards for many years now. Savannah is a beautiful city with a not so beautiful past, and through the efforts of the community is building itself up to be great again. This shot embodies Savannah. The strip of MLK Drive shows the many different sides of Savannah, but this sign shows what Savannah is striving for.

More work by Susan Berger can be found here.

#42

David Attie

Attie, David. Brooklyn, 1958

Attie, David. Brooklyn, 1958

Brooklyn, NY photographer David Attie's son Eli recently came upon some of his father's old negatives and has put them together in a show called “Truman Capote’s Brooklyn: The Lost Photographs of David Attie,” that shares captivating images of New York City during the 1950's. Way of life was clearly different back then, but what will remain forever is the wide tonal range and almost surreal shots of every day New Yorker's every day lives. It is apparent that Attie was not afraid to get low to take a photograph, and in some cases, like when shooting children, it becomes so much more believable that we're there peering in on ordinary activity, taking part in a moment long forgotten. 

#41

Diane Arbus

Arbus, Diane. Man in hat, trunks, socks and shoes, Coney Island, N.Y. 1960.

Arbus, Diane. Man in hat, trunks, socks and shoes, Coney Island, N.Y. 1960.

Another New York photographer from the mid 1900's, however Arbus and Attie differ greatly in subject matter. Attie was all about every day life and capturing the essence of Brooklyn life while Arbus was more interested in the freaks and weirdos, the ones that hid in the daylight, people not often photographed. This makes sense due to the fact she started taking these types of images after her and her husband (who shared a fashion photography career together) went their separate ways. She seemed to be interested in the non traditional types of beauty, as pictured above. Sort of grungy, no shirt, hairy, and slightly chunky, this man surely would not be a beauty icon nor would he be shot by Attie, looking for the ideal. This is why Arbus stood out and became the star photographer she was. 

 

And that's all for now! Finally getting into the dark room and making physical prints has made my work and my creativity do a 180... for the better. Exploring the roots of photography, and seeing work from modern photographers who choose to go the old school way inspires me and makes me think that I might have to just continue my experience with film even outside of class.

 

Thanks for reading, hope you enjoyed it and found a little inspiration yourself. Check back for more!